ECSCW 2019 Doctoral Colloquium

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  • Conference Paper
    Towards Community-Robot Interactions
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Joshi, Swapna
    Technical advances in multi-user robotics are supporting their increased real-world robot deployments in community and organizational settings. However, interactions with robots in these settings are viewed mostly as an aggregate of individual interactions with robots, separate from their social context. Through my Ph.D. research, I raise awareness about the need for a community perspective to Human-Robot Interactions (HRI) and use real-world studies to demonstrate the conceptual and methodological relevance of community-centric approaches to robot use. The goal of my research is to provide a value framework of ‘Community-Robot Interactions’ for systematic study of the use and development of robots for communities and probe the role of the robots as a community resource having theoretical and design implications for HRI.
  • Conference Paper
    Sustainability in Crisis: Towards Business Continuity in Small and Medium Enterprises
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Syed, Hussain Abid
    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) epitomize a vital part in all developed and developing economies. SMEs being peculiar in nature and operations are often the most affected in case of an emergency or a crisis. Mostly, the scarcity of resources in respect to employees, time and capital make them more vulnerable to crisis. This article instantiates the need of risk assessment and disaster preparedness, and hence the utility of BCM in the context of SMEs as a viable option. It further establishes the technological foundation of a comprehensive BCM realization for SMEs.
  • Conference Paper
    Appropriation and Practices of Working with Voice Assistants in the Kitchen
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Pins, Dominik
    For our research, we focus on the kitchen as an important space at home that is not only used for cooking but also has a strong social role in the household (Johannes-Hornschuh, 2010). Many housekeeping tasks take place in the kitchen that can be supported by VAs, such as managing a shopping list or the (family) calendar or researching nutrition and food. These interactions are interesting to study in terms of their social and collaborative components. The kitchen offers many relevant tasks which are often rather complex and might require mixed- media approaches for successful support that might well exceed the capabilities of the VA technology in the current form (Moore, 2017). Better understanding where there are areas for innovation and what we can learn from the current practices of interaction to work around the current limitations is a further aim of our work.
  • Conference Paper
    Feedback Practices in Collaborative Video Editing
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Okopnyi, Pavel
    This project focuses on feedback practices in collaborative video editing. Video editing is commonly done collaboratively, but when done in a distributed and asynchronous setting, there are challenges tied to how to give feedback and refer to particular issues and segments of the moving images. This project aims to understand these feedback practices through interviews and observations of video workers, identify implications for design, and conduct design workshops with video editing professionals to prototype solutions for supporting awareness in collaborative video editing.
  • Conference Paper
    Crafting Unconventional Artifacts to Support Long-distance Relationships: An Overview of Doctoral Research
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Li, Hong
    This paper presents an overview of my doctoral research thus far, which has been dedicated to creating unconventional artifacts that use interaction solutions beyond conventional screen displays to mediate emotional communication in the use case of long-distance relationships.
  • Conference Paper
    Understanding and Supporting Collaborative Academic Writing as a Fragmented Process
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Larsen-Ledet, Ida
    I present an overview of findings from a qualitative study regarding territorial functioning and fragmentation in collaborative academic writing. The findings demonstrate how collaborative writing may be characterized as a fragmented process, due to territorial functioning manifesting in segregation of the work as well as fragmentation across constellations of tools with similar functionality. I describe co-writers' appropriation of existing tools to achieve double-level language and outline a focus for future design efforts for a co-design process.
  • Conference Paper
    Academic Library Managers’ Use of Artefacts in their Everyday Cooperative Work Practices
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Chatzipanagiotou, Niki
    This interpretive focused-ethnographic study was conducted to illuminate and gain deeper understanding on managers’ everyday cooperative work practices using artefacts. In the dissertation, artefacts refer to digital technologies and information. The doctoral research specifically examines how artefacts in the workplace of an academic library are used in academic library managers’ everyday cooperative work practices; and provide suggestions of how artefacts can be used to better fit those practices. The empirical data was collected through participant observations, face-to-face interviews and documents from two technologically advanced academic libraries, one in Sweden and another one in Australia. The study uses soft systems thinking theory and concepts from computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) such as awareness, articulation and appropriation to analyze and discuss how cooperative work is conducted in the everyday work practices of academic library managers with the use of artefacts. Thus, this research contributes insights from the field of computer-supported cooperative work to the information systems and library domain by considering social aspects of cooperative everyday work practices.
  • Conference Paper
    Social Augmentation od Enterprise Communication Systems for Virtual Teams Using Chatbots
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Benke, Ivo
    Innovative collaborative applications like Slack or Microsoft Teams have become an integral part of the working environment. The communication in teams, especially at work, is aggravated by socio-technical challenges which prohibit teams from reaching their optimal performance. This research addresses these problems and designs an enterprise communication system to actively support team interaction in order to increase team performance. Through social augmentation of the communication processes with chatbots this is achieved, leveraging cognitive-affective user states. First results of the system prototype evaluation are promising, showing an improvement of team cohesion and communication effectiveness induced through the design. Serving as indication, future steps are outlined guiding the research path for social augmentation of team communication.
  • Conference Paper
    Using Software Agents to Raise Awareness and Lower Information Overload in a Multi-user Collaborative Environment
    (Proceedings of 17th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work - Doctoral Colloquium, 2019) Goddard, David
    Ubiquitous devices provide users with notifications that continue to blur the distinction between work and personal activities and can lead to information overload. This research aims to support users of multiple collaborative and social systems who may experience this, by designing and evaluating a personal software agent to support the user and ameliorate the effects of overload. A technique uniting personas and Empathy Map has been applied to model typical user behaviours, goals and pain points, which will inform the design of a solution to manage interruptions and information overload.