Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://dl.eusset.eu/handle/20.500.12015/3205
Title: Barriers for Bridging Interpersonal Gaps: Three Inspirational Design Patterns for Increasing Collocated Social Interaction
Authors: Mitchell, Robb
Olsson, Thomas
Lewkowicz, Myriam
Rohde, Markus
Mulder, Ingrid
Schuler, Douglas
Keywords: Face-to-face interaction;collocated interaction;embodied interaction;pattern languages;social interaction design
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: ACM Press, New York
metadata.dc.relation.ispartof: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Communities and Technologies
metadata.mci.reference.pages: 2-11
Abstract: Positive face-to-face social encounters between strangers can strengthen the sense of community in modern urban environments. However, it is not always easy to initiate friendly encounters due to various inhibiting social norms. We present three inspirational design patterns for reducing inhibitions to interact with unfamiliar others. These abstractions are based on a broad design space review of concepts, encompassing examples across a range of scales, fields, media and forms. Each inspirational pattern is formulated as a response to a different challenge to initiating social interaction but all share an underlying similarity in offering varieties of barriers and filters that paradoxically also separate people. The patterns are "Closer Through Not Seeing"; "Closer Through Not Touching"; and "Minimize Encounter Duration". We believe these patterns can support designers, in understanding, articulating, and generating approaches to creating embodied interventions and systems that enable unacquainted people to interact.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1145/3083671.3083697
ISBN: 978-1-4503-4854-6
metadata.mci.conference.sessiontitle: Long Papers
metadata.mci.conference.location: Troyes, France
metadata.mci.conference.date: June 26-30, 2017
Appears in Collections:C&T 2017: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Communities and Technologies

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